Charlie’s Cues: Using Your Weather Display

By nature, children are curious about the weather. This post will focus on helping children learn about and study the weather while using Weather Displays, a resourceful tool found in your Buttercups and Fireflies Starter Packs. Making weather observations with children is a comprehensive process. First, they predict or forecast the weather, and then they test their predictions by making observations and exploring with their senses. Children also explore the concept of cause and effect when they engage with the weather.

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Learning Through Infant Care Routines: Diaper Changes

Infants have daily needs that need to be met for them to learn, develop positive attachment to primary caregivers, and know they will be loved and taken care of. Most of these needs revolve around basic care routines. The FunShine Express Buttercups Babies kits were designed to incorporate activity ideas into these care routines to create meaningful interactions each day.

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Say Goodbye to Summer Learning Loss – 6 Free School-Age Activities

Students across the country are counting down the days until summer break. Plans are being made with friends finding good ways to spend this downtime. While parents plan plenty of outdoor time and maybe even summer camps to keep their children busy, the children likely have other ideas to fill their days. With the abundance of electronics, streaming, and social media, you can bet many students are planning a lot of screen time this summer. Students tend to avoid activities that resemble anything they would do in school during the summer, and this can lead to summer learning loss.

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Charlie’s Cues: Using Your Sequence Cards

From an early age, children begin to explore the concept of time through the procedures, steps, and sequence of events. I remember when my daughter was in the hospital at the age of four. We spent about 10 days together reading books and singing, to the point that after a few days she memorized one of the stories. She would choose the book, turn the pages, and recite each part of the story. Not only did she learn parts of the story, but by associating what she heard me read with the pictures, she learned the whole story and was able to tell it over again in order.

Sequence, order, and routine are important to a child’s development. As babies, children adjust to eating, sleeping, and playing routines. Then they begin to understand before and after and begin to incorporate it into small conversations with peers or adults. With time, children continue to learn about time and sequence, through experiences, consistency in routines, illustrations, and stories. All of this helps them better understand their days from beginning to end. Let’s discover together one tool that can help you present and develop this concept successfully.

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