No Snow?

by Judy Mullican

Happy child baby girl in snow winterAs I sit at my desk, snow is falling in big fluffy flakes and covering the ground. There is something magical about the way snow transforms the dull browns of winter into a frosty fairyland. I’ve lived in enough different places to know that winter can be very different for others! Some readers may be wearing shorts and T-shirts and looking at blue skies. Others may be experiencing a steamy, damp day.

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Colder Weather? No Problem!

10 Indoor Activities to Encourage Active Play

Colder weather causes many of us to spend more time indoors, which in turn dwindles our ambitions to stay active. With less time outdoors to release energy, having rambunctious toddlers or preschoolers in the house can be exhausting. You might be tempted to turn on the TV or hand them your tablet so they keep entertained more quietly. However, young children need lots of active play which promotes physical development and fosters their imaginations. What can the children do indoors to stay active? We compiled a list of activities that will keep your little ones busy instead of sitting in front of a screen.

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Beyond Building a Snowman

by Judy Mullican

Everyone knows how much fun it is to build a snowman! But after building a snowman, what are some other fun ways to play in the snow?

Beyond Snowman-Snowy Day1. Play like Peter! Read The Snowy Day or watch this animated version on the Ezra Jack Keats Foundation website: www.ezra-jack-keats.org/the-snowy-day . (Click “Read Aloud.”) Talk with your children about all the fun things Peter does in the snow. Go outside and try some! Explore different ways to make footprints in the snow. Try making snow angels. Have fun!

2. Explore writing! The children may use their hands and feet, wooden spoons, or other tools to write their names or simple messages in the snow. Younger ones may simply enjoy making loops and squiggles.

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Understanding Difference

by Teresa Narey

Child development researchers have found that children become aware of difference from an age much earlier than we anticipate. Some studies have found that children as young as three months old prefer the company of individuals from their own ethnic group, and according to Penn State University’s Better Kid Care, children start to notice gender and racial differences at the age of two. With this in mind, it is no surprise that current early childhood education research aims to support providers in addressing difference in their work with young children. Though difference is a term used to describe something as unique, it in fact applies to everything.  When we approach teaching difference with this idea in mind, the concept seems less intimidating and far more accessible.  Teaching children about difference doesn’t necessarily mean calling attention to children’s race, gender, ethnicity, or family composition.  It simply means taking a closer look at the everyday things that surround us.

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Vibrant and Sweet: Celebrating Diwali

by Teresa Narey

Introduction and Background

A quick Internet search for Diwali (pronounced dee-VAH-lee) yields many results that compare this Indian holiday to Christmas. While the bright colors and flowers associated with India’s most cherished festival may not immediately draw up images of a snowy Christmas, its emphasis on sweets, gift-giving, and spirituality will certainly resonate with you.

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Not Halloween: An Introduction to Dia de los Muertos

by Teresa Narey

Introduction and Background:

In the U.S., the end of October is traditionally marked by the celebration of Halloween. In greater America, however, another holiday emphasizing fun, food, and costumes calls attention to the passing of time. Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, is celebrated in Mexico and throughout Latin America on November 1 and 2, All Saints’ Day and All Souls’ Day, respectively (click here for help pronouncing Spanish words). On the surface, Dia de los Muertos and Halloween appear to have much in common, but a closer look at customs tells us otherwise.

The purpose of Dia de los Muertos is to honor the memories of deceased loved ones by having parties, displaying their favorite items in ofrendas (altars), and participating in activities they once enjoyed. Celebrations highlight the idea that our ancestors are still with us in spirit. Acknowledging Dia de los Muertos in your setting provides children with a multicultural experience that extends autumn’s greatest lesson—the circle of life.

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Promoting Play Through Independent Activity Centers

by Katie Brazerol

Children benefit from choosing and freely exploring materials in interactive learning centers throughout your setting. Providing a space that encourages children to explore, interact with others, and use critical thinking skills without constant adult direction allows them to gain independence. Children can use independent activity centers during free play or as transition activities while waiting for others to finish a task.

Set Up the Centers

  • Include materials to support current concepts and topics of interest to the children.
  • Offer age-appropriate materials that can be used with minimal adult supervision.
  • Promote multiple learning domains. Rotate activities that focus on language/literacy, math, science, social studies, social/emotional well-being, physical development, and creative arts (music, art, and dramatic play).

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