STEAM Series: Mastering M

THe m in steam

The M in STEAM stands for Math. Math in STEAM helps little ones learn about patterns, numbers, shapes, sorting rules, and measurements in hands-on and fun ways. Learning about math concepts starts at an early age. You will likely use the sign and word for more early on with your infants. They will learn that this gets them more of a favorite activity or food. For example, after a child eats his last piece of banana, you might say, “Would you like more banana?,” while using the sign for more. The child might start associating the sign with the word and use it to get more banana. Older infants and toddlers will likely learn the concept of two early on also. For example, they understand: I have two hands. I can hold two toys. I have two feet, two arms, two legs, two eyes, and two ears! Wow! Learning basic math concepts at an early age can help children learn about more complex mathematical relationships as they grow older.

Here are 8 easy Math ideas to incorporate into your setting:

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STEAM Series: Exploring E

The E in STEAM

The E in STEAM stands for Engineering. Engineering in STEAM helps little ones learn how and why things work. Simple engineering concepts include learning cause and effect, creating, building, and problem-solving. Create an environment that is rich in a variety of materials. Some possible building materials to incorporate into your setting are wooden blocks in various sizes, cloth blocks, cardboard boxes, paper and plastic cups, bowls and plates, nesting cups, baking sheets, and cardboard tubes from paper towels or wrapping paper. Provide assorted toys such as balls, cars, and animals. When looking for materials to bring out, think about ones that are safe, open-ended, and can be combined with other materials/toys.

Here are 7 easy Engineering ideas to incorporate into your setting:

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Learning with Lids

by Judy Mullican

There are so many fun ways to use jar lids and other lids for early learning. The best thing is that using them keeps them out of the landfill and doesn’t cost you a dime! They are even washable. If you work with younger children, just be sure that the lids are large enough not to cause a choking hazard. Whenever you buy jelly, jam, peanut butter, baby food, or other foods that come with lids, simply wash and save the lids. Ask the children’s families to save lids too and you’ll soon have a great collection. Here are 14 ways to use them for fun and learning:

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