Charlie’s Cues: Using the Alphabet Word Cards

The sounds, words, songs, rhymes, and illustrations children are exposed to influence the ways they speak and communicate. This is why an environment rich in writing, letters, and vocabulary offers them the opportunity to develop strong language skills.

The Fireflies curriculum, for ages 3-5, becomes part of building a writing-rich classroom by including Alphabet Word Cards as part of your monthly kit. The cards show the letters that will be taught that month, accompanied by illustrations. Each month the letters taught are different but the purpose behind the cards is the same: to help children acquire vocabulary, learn new letters and their sounds, encourage repetition, and familiarize children with and help them become comfortable with using new words.

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Charlie’s Cues: Using the Search and Find

To keep the attention of infants and toddlers, interactions usually have to be entertaining, engaging, and include items of interest. Young children enjoy searching for hidden things, following lights and sounds, and looking at images with bright colors and patterns. These types of activities prompt children to explore and grow curiosity in them. This is why we are including a new component in our bimonthly Buttercups kit, the Search and Find Piece. As always, I am writing to help you understand our featured component’s use, benefit, and how to adapt it in different areas of your classroom and routine.

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Charlie’s Cues: Incorporating Music and Movements

Children’s development is highly dependent upon their environment. How much are the children in your care exposed to music, language, movement, or exercising freely? A balanced variety of activities that include songs and movements is sure to increase children’s attention, help them socialize with peers, and prepare them to learn and be more perceptive in future activities throughout the day.

Other than the physical benefits of enjoying songs with movements or exercise, research shows that songs and rhymes help children’s language development. As children listen to instructions given during physical activities, they build a relationship between the words they hear and the movements they see; they make meaning of the words as they imitate movements or create new ones. Through songs and rhymes, children also learn sounds, syllables, and musical patterns. Children will slowly continue to store their experiences until they feel prepared to say their own words, repeat the words in a rhyme, build short sentences, or sing along.

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