FunShine Books and Reading Tips

As I enter my third year as curriculum manager for FunShine Express, I can safely say that reviewing books for our curriculum is my favorite part of the job. Each fall, I work with our writers to finalize themes for the next year. Once those are in place, I can begin working with vendors and publishers to secure samples of books that explore the subject matter and concepts conveyed in each theme. My background is in writing for children and early childhood education, so I feel especially compelled to find books that are both imaginative and educational. Our offerings over the past few years have covered everything from concept and nonfiction books to retellings of nursery rhymes and books in song. We offered our first bilingual book in the September/October 2020 Buttercups Kit and strive to offer more in the future. This is just one highlight of many.

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Storytime Spotlight: September Reads

One of the most exciting updates to the FunShine Express curriculum this year was the additional books included in the Fireflies and Buttercups programs. The children’s books are consistently ranked highly on our customer survey as a favorite component. This year we made some changes in order to include an additional book to help you expand your classroom library!

Read more about the September books and why we selected these titles.

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Storytime Spotlight: Hey-Ho, To Mars We’ll Go!

Staring out into the dark, starry night, have you ever wondered what it would be like to go to Mars? At some point in our lives, we all dream about what it would be like to experience weightlessness in space as we travel to distant planets or galaxies. This wonder begins in early childhood as children begin to notice the sun, moon, stars, and clouds in the sky.

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Early Literacy – Writing Development

by Kelley Jilek

Children learn about writing long before they are able to write themselves. They discover more about written language each time they see print in their environment. It was once believed that children would not be able to write until they had mastered the basic aspects of spoken language, but children are “writing” when they experiment with different paint strokes or when they scribble various marks across a paper. We now know all developmental aspects of early literacy (speaking, reading, and writing) build on each other and develop simultaneously.

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