Using STREAM Techniques After Disasters to Keep Kids Learning and Engaged

Guest Post
by Andrew Roszak
Executive Director, The Institute for Childhood Preparedness

With natural disasters on the rise, many child care programs have endured floods, earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, and severe weather conditions. These programs face many obstacles when re-opening, including a lack of electricity, supplies, fresh drinking water, and food, as well as the on-set of fear and mental health conditions in children.

We are always searching for new ways to make child care providers and teachers more resilient. One new trend is to incorporate principles of STREAM into early childhood education – to help students learn about S: Science, T: Technology, R: Reading, E: Engineering, A: Arts, and M: Math.

In the absence of a standard operating environment, and without creature comforts – such as electricity, providers may want to think about how they can incorporate the principles of STREAM in a post-disaster setting.

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Positive Good-Byes

by Kelley Jilek

Most children experience some type of separation anxiety during infant, toddler and preschool years. The circumstances and ages can vary widely. Some infants become alarmed when held by someone they don’t know, while others are content. A toddler who has been happy in a child care setting begins to cry one day when being dropped off and continues this for the next several weeks. This behavior can be frustrating and concerning for both parents and caregivers. Should parents be worried? How can providers console the child and convince parents that all is well?

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