Understanding Difference

by Teresa Narey

Child development researchers have found that children become aware of difference from an age much earlier than we anticipate. Some studies have found that children as young as three months old prefer the company of individuals from their own ethnic group, and according to Penn State University’s Better Kid Care, children start to notice gender and racial differences at the age of two. With this in mind, it is no surprise that current early childhood education research aims to support providers in addressing difference in their work with young children. Though difference is a term used to describe something as unique, it in fact applies to everything.  When we approach teaching difference with this idea in mind, the concept seems less intimidating and far more accessible.  Teaching children about difference doesn’t necessarily mean calling attention to children’s race, gender, ethnicity, or family composition.  It simply means taking a closer look at the everyday things that surround us.

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Getting Preschoolers to Eat Vegetables

by Kelley Jilek

A healthy diet and lifestyle can never start early enough. MyPlate suggests that half our plates should consist of fruits and vegetables. Unfortunately, kids are inundated with misinformation from media and advertisements every day. There are many factors that shape food habits and behaviors in children. Here are some tips for getting your little ones to try some healthier foods:

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Spring Treats

by Judy Mullican

Welcome spring with some healthy, refreshing treats! Here are some nutritious and tasty recipes to offer. Some would be perfect if you are celebrating St. Patrick’s Day! (Caution: Always check for allergies before serving any food.)

Spring Garden PizzaSpring-Garden-Pizza

Crust:
1 cup quick or old-fashioned rolled oats
1¼ cup plain flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon salt
¾ milk
2 tablespoons olive oil or other vegetable oil

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Following Directions

by Kelley Jilek

father and sonFollowing directions is an important life skill that spans several different areas of your child’s development. What we learn about following directions in our childhood can be the difference between enjoying success or experiencing failure in our ventures as adults. For example, a cook follows directions when trying a new recipe and a carpenter follows directions when constructing a new piece of furniture. Learning to follow directions is clearly an important part of our lives. Help your child learn to follow directions successfully by trying the suggestions below:

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